Police Direct

Police Direct provides information about current issues in our area.  This page will be updated as new information becomes available.

11.04.16

Police are appealing for information following a number of thefts from vehicles in Ixworth last week.

Two vans were targeted in Peddars Close between 7pm Wednesday 6th & 7.30am Thursday 7th April. Various tools were stolen from one of them; a rucksack & its contents were stolen from the second.

In New Road between 10pm Wednesday 6th & 7am Thursday 7th April, a van was broken into and tools stolen.

If you have any information about these thefts please contact Suffolk Police on 101 quoting reference 37/26684/16.


08.04.16 

If you have been visited by a company offering air-to-air heating systems or an 'iboost' system, Suffolk Trading Standards would like to hear from you.

Trading Standards have received a complaint from a Suffolk consumer who has paid money to the company and they are concerned by the alleged trading practices and tactics used by them. 

For more information, please visit the Suffolk Trading Standards news article https://suffolktradingstandards.wordpress.com/2016/04/08/warning-and-urgent-request-for-information-about-a-heating-system-company/

If you have any information or have been contacted by this company, please contact Suffolk Trading Standards on 01473 264859 and ask to speak with Stuart Hughes.


 

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

DO NOT USE THIS LINK IN AN EMERGENCY OR IN A SITUATION THAT REQUIRES AN IMMEDIATE POLICE RESPONSE WHEN YOU SHOULD RING 999.

Police Connect Team

 


22.03.16

The new county policing model in Suffolk goes live on Monday 4th April. Teams and resources have been re-designed following the Suffolk Local Policing Review, to ensure that policing in Suffolk is able to respond to current demand.

Analysis of demand has been a driving factor in the re-design of policing services, as senior leaders have looked to identify where resources and services can be better structured to make sure that members of the public get the service they need from the right agency at the right time.

The results of this analysis have led to a series of changes including enhanced processes for the investigation of crime, a reduction in the number of police station front counters to reflect the demand they face and the relocation of Safer Neighbourhood Teams and emergency response bases according to demand.

 

Police are available at all times for an urgent response – public safety remains the top priority and this will always be the case. Nationally, more than three quarters of 999 calls received by police are for non-emergencies. This number should be protected for urgent calls, and it is important that members of the public understand the variety of ways they can get in touch for the most effective response.

Within Suffolk Constabulary’s Contact and Control Room (CCR):

-       Around 284,000 calls are received per year, or approx 782 per day (average based on 2015 including 999 and non-emergency calls).

-       Only around 20% of these relate to crime.  The remaining 80% are made up of administrative calls, or relate to anti-social behaviour, public safety / welfare and transport.

-       The largest proportion is attributable to public safety and welfare calls.

A large number of calls are received that do not relate to police matters. The police are often the ‘service of last resort’ – people call the police when they don’t know who else to call.  The commitment of police to public safety means that officers are sent to calls for help that are not police-related and are therefore diverting resources from emergencies.

To tackle these issues, the Constabulary is working to improve its online services to make sure that more information is readily available through its website to answer queries and to direct members of the public to the correct agency, and through raising awareness of the correct use of police numbers and the breadth of policing demand.

How to get in touch

By phone

 999 – In an emergency, always dial 999.  If a crime is in progress or if there is a threat to life, call immediately and you will receive an urgent response.

101 – For non-urgent police matters, dial 101.  The number is available 24/7 and is for reporting less-urgent crime, to speak with someone about an incident already reported, or to contact a specific police officer or member of staff.

 Online

 Website – visit www.suffolk.police.ukto report a crime, to report a fraud and to find the answer to a huge range of policing questions. Safety advice can also be found online, along with contact details for our teams.

Social Media

 Non-urgent messages can be sent to police via the Constabulary Facebook page – Suffolk Constabulary Official Page or via @SuffolkPolice on Twitter.  Following these accounts provides regular access to crime and policing updates.  These should not be used for requesting urgent police assistance.

In person

 Police stations - Police station front counters at Bury St Edmunds, Ipswich and Lowestoft will be open from 9am-5pm Monday – Friday and Saturday 10am-6pm. Station clerks can assist with a range of policing queries and can take reports of crime.

 Local officers – Safer Neighbourhood Team officers spend time out and about in local communities and are available to speak about local issues.

Non-police matters

At times, the police are not the best agency to provide the support or help needed. The Constabulary should always be the first port of call when someone is in danger or a crime is in progress but alternative agencies should be contacted for issues including:

Noisy neighbours: The police do not have any powers to prosecute for noise nuisance. The Environmental Health department of your local authority should be contacted unless a crime is in progress.

 Defective street lights: the local council has the responsibility for maintaining or repairing street lights.

Rogue traders: Reports of rogue traders should be made to Trading Standards.  If you are aware of an incident in progress, or someone is in danger call police on 999.

 Lost or found dogs: Local councils have dog wardens who deal with lost or found dogs, call them for assistance and advice with these matters.

Full information on the services provided by the Council can be found at www.suffolk.gov.uk.

Chief Constable Gareth Wilson said: "As a police service, it is crucial that we are available when people need us, at all times.

"To help us, we need to make sure people know the most appropriate ways to get in contact. By sending an email, reporting a less serious issue online, or dialling 101 when it is not an emergency, you are protecting our 999 number and ensuring that it is used only for urgent calls for help.

 "As part of our review of local policing services, we undertook extensive analysis to understand how and why people contact us.  As a result, we are working to make sure we are available in the ways people want – moving resources away from areas such as police station front counters where demand has significantly decreased, and enhancing our online presence to improve the services available on our website and other digital channels.

 "It’s also important for people to recognise what is and isn’t a police matter.  The demand we face is extremely complex and our resources are finite, so making the right call ensures that our teams are dealing with matters affecting communities and responding to reports of crime. Knowing who to call in the first place will not only reduce the volume of calls to our staff, but will save members of the public time by speaking to the correct organisation in the first instance.”

Police and Crime Commissioner Tim Passmore said: "The most important message we can relay to the public is that if you need help from the police – they will be there for you, night or day.

"I am proud of the service that Suffolk Police provides, it provides an efficient and effective service to the people of Suffolk and we should all be reassured that we live in a safe county. I opted to keep the control room in the county which was a big decision for me, now I am committed to improving the service and where possible joining up with other agencies to provide a broader and better service for the county.

"I fully support the Constabulary’s campaign to highlight what is, and what is not, an issue for the police to deal with. You would be amazed at some of the calls that come through to the control room – a very high percentage are not police issues at all and with a little bit of thought and common sense many of the calls could be directed more effectively to the correct agency.

"The Constabulary is always going to be the agency of last resort and that is absolutely right. If you are at risk, under threat or feeling vulnerable the police will help you regardless if a crime has been committed and that will remain the case, always.”

Full information on the Suffolk Local Policing Review is available here.

 Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

 

22.03.16

 

With the clocks going forward this weekend, householders across Suffolk are being urged not to make it easy for potential thieves.

Officers are advising people to pay extra attention to home, bike and vehicle security with the onset of lighter nights – often seen as an opportunist time for this type of crime.

 Suffolk Chief Superintendent David Skevington said: "Most thefts are carried out by opportunist criminals. The coming summer months can bring with them thieves on the look-out for lapses in security – such as doors and windows left open, bicycles poorly secured or property left on display at beauty spot car parks.

 "People are advised to be aware and make use of simple crime prevention methods which deprive thieves of the opportunity to steal."

 Suffolk Constabulary offers the following advice to residents:

Windows

Always lock your windows when you leave the house.

Remove the keys and keep them in a safe place. However, everyone should know where the keys are kept so they can escape in an emergency.

 Doors

Keep your front and back doors locked or in view when you are at home.

Use or consider fitting a door chain and spy hole - a chain allows you to speak to the caller without opening the door fully and the spy hole also you to see who is at the door.

 Fit five lever mortice locks to all external doors.

 Check your cylinder locks on patio/plastic doors and ensure they are snap and bump resistant - a local Master Locksmith can advise if you are not sure.

Keys

Never leave a spare key in a convenient hiding place such as under the doormat, burglars know all the usual hiding places.

Never leave your house or car keys in or near a door or window.

 Attention should also be paid to the security of sheds and garages and to the property stored within.

Parked cars – especially those left in remote areas such as beauty spots – should be left locked and secure with no property left on display and satellite navigation devices, car audio equipment, cameras, handbags and laptops should be removed from the vehicle entirely.

 Bikes should always be left secure, using a sturdy lock covering the bike stand, wheel rim and frame together.

 People attending large scale events or out and about in busy areas should be mindful of thieves and keep handbags closed and mobile phones out of sight and kept securely on their person.

 Chief Superintendent Skevington added: "Suffolk is an extremely safe place to live and your chances of being a victim of such crimes still remain extremely low, but you should consider making your house look like someone is at home.

 "With the weather improving, more of us will be out and about so please remember to keep your property secure and don’t become an easy target.

 "We would also encourage people to be a good neighbour - if anyone is spotted acting suspiciously in your neighbourhood, call the police."

 The clocks go forward on Sunday 27 March 2016.

 Anyone with information about thieves operating in their area should contact Suffolk Constabulary on 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously by calling 0800 555 111.

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

21.03.16

Young people aged between 13 and 18 are invited to apply for a place in one of three new police cadets units, as Suffolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Tim Passmore today announced an extension of the very successful Volunteer Police Cadet scheme to Beccles, Stowmarket and Mildenhall.

As part of his commitment to engaging with children and young people, the PCC has invested in the growth of the Cadet scheme from the four original units to nine units covering the breadth of the county.  The three new units are being launched in Mildenhall on Tuesday 24th May; in Stowmarket on Wednesday 25th May and in Beccles on Saturday 28th May.

 At present there are six schemes in operation in the county, Felixstowe and Woodbridge, Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds, Sudbury, Haverhill and Lowestoft and of these the cadets in Haverhill and Lowestoft, are joint units with the Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service.

 Volunteer Police Cadets are part of a youth engagement programme to assist young people in raising aspirations and becoming pillars of their community, it is open to young people aged from 13 up to 18 who meet on a weekly basis to encourage the spirit of adventure and develop qualities of leadership and good citizenship.

 Tim Passmore, Suffolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner said: “I have seen first-hand the positive impact that being a cadet has had on young people involved in existing units and I am delighted to be able to extend this successful scheme across the county. The cadet motto ‘It’s not where you’ve come from; It’s where you’re going that counts’ perfectly encapsulates the aim of the organisation, which is to help young people become good citizens.

 “All too often young people make a wrong choice as teenagers and this limits their choices in the future. By showing the young people how to make positive life choices it is hoped that they will become good citizens and develop leadership qualities that will help them to become more confident and principled adults.

“In my police and crime plan I committed my support to the cadets and pledged to expand and improve the scheme so I am delighted to announce the launch of these new schemes which all will start in May.

Assistant Chief Constable Rachel Kearton said: “I am extremely pleased that our cadet scheme is being extended to cover other parts of the county.

“It is crucial that as a police force we engage with young people from an early age and provide them with positive opportunities to contribute towards their communities.

 “The scheme allows us to work with young people to equip them with a range of useful life skills, as well as to provide them with an insight into the work of the Constabulary and the variety of career paths it can offer.  I hope that lots of people take up the opportunity to get involved.”

The cadets meetings will be held in Beccles at Beccles Free School on Saturday mornings between 10am and midday; in Stowmarket at the High School on Wednesday evenings between 6-7.30pm during school term-times and at St Mary’s Primary School in Mildenhall on Thursday evenings between 7pm-9pm.

Anyone interested in joining the cadet scheme or becoming a leader should contact cadetsinfo@suffolk.pnn.police.uk or call Matt Newman on 101.

15.03.16

Police are appealing for communities to ‘See it, Hear it, Report it’ by being vigilant and looking out for suspicious activity following a spate of burglaries in villages to the north of Bury St Edmunds.

Since January this year there have been 13 burglaries or attempted burglaries across five villages located in and around the A143 corridor.

 Three of these offences have taken place in Barningham, the first of which was discovered on 7 January and the most recent on 1 March. Four burglaries have occurred in Great Barton between 31 January and 12 March.

Four burglaries have also occurred in Stanton and there has been one each in Hopton and Coney Weston. These have all taken place between 7 February and 1 March.

 All of these incidents have involved doors or windows being forced open, or attempts to force them open, and have usually taken place whilst the occupants were away. Items stolen include jewellery, cash, electrical items and power tools.

 Detective Inspector Karl Nightingale, of Bury St Edmunds CID, said: "We are appealing for anyone who may have seen any suspicious persons or vehicles in the vicinity of these villages to contact us. Intelligence from local communities is often crucial in helping us to identify suspects for these types of crime.

"The fact that many of these burglaries have taken place whilst the residents were away could indicate that the offenders have visited the area prior to the burglaries taking place.

"Don’t dismiss someone or something that looks out of place – if you believe it to be suspicious then contact police with descriptions of people or registration numbers of vehicles.

"If planning to go away for the night or on holiday, you are advised to let close neighbours know that the house will be unoccupied so they can keep an eye on it. Neighbours will then know if they see or hear anyone at your property that they should not be there.”

Anyone with information in relation to these burglaries, or who believes they may have witnessed suspicious activity in their community, is asked to contact Suffolk police on 101, or alternatively you can speak to Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. If you believe a crime to be in progress always call 999.

Members of the public are advised to consider the following measures to help protect their property:

 -       Ensure all doors and windows are routinely kept secured and robust locks are fitted

 -       Where possible, restrict access to the back garden with hedging or 6ft high fencing around the perimeter and keep any side/rear gates locked & secure

 -       Keep any hedges or fences at the front of the property to a maximum height of 3ft, this improves visibility to the house and reduces the chances for a burglar to remain out of sight

 -       Ensure all tools and ladders are kept locked away in outbuildings – burglars will often break-in to houses using items they find at the property

 -       Install dusk-to-dawn security lighting

 -       Consider installing an intruder alarm

 -       Use lights on timers inside the house, especially during autumn and winter months when it gets dark early, or when away on holiday. This can help create the impression that someone is at home

-       Security mark your property, ideally with a forensic marking solution, and register serial numbers on www.immobilise.com

 -       Take photographs of jewellery or other valuable property so these can be passed to police if stolen and help with their recovery

 Further home security advice can be found on our website: http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/homesecurity/burglary.aspx

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

10.03.16

The new model for policing in Suffolk will be launched on Monday 4th April.  The re-designed model has been agreed as a result of the Suffolk Local Policing Review, and will enable the Constabulary to respond to the changing nature of crime, with resources located according to demand.

The new model will see the county divided into nine localities, each led with an inspector, who will oversee the work of Safer Neighbourhood Teams and emergency response officers within their area. Three Superintendents will oversee this work, being responsible for the East, West and South of the county.

Events have been arranged across the county to allow members of the public, partners and members of the media to meet their new Locality Inspector and to hear about how teams will be working within local communities.  Those attending will also have the opportunity to ask questions and to comment on policing in their area under the new model.

**Public meeting to meet the new South West Ipswich Locality Inspector, Kevin Horton will be held tonight, Thursday 10th March 6:30pm at the Chantry Methodist Church, Kingfisher Ave, Ipswich**

The new Inspectors are:

West

Mark Shipton (Mildenhall)
Matthew Dee (Bury St Edmunds)
Danny Cooper (Sudbury / Haverhill)
Chris Galley (Stowmarket)

South

Kevin Horton (South West)
Sarsfield Donohue (Ipswich Central) – Sarsfield will take over in May – Inspector Neil McKay will hold the meeting and be in post until this time.
Roger Salmon (South East)

East

Nicholas Aitken (Halesworth)
Richard Hill (Lowestoft)

Dates and locations for forthcoming meetings are listed on the Suffolk Police website http://www.suffolk.police.uk/newsandevents/newsstories/2016/march/meetyourlocalityinspector.aspx

These are public meetings and anyone is welcome to attend

Further details on the new local policing model can be found here:

 

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/newsandevents/newsstories/2015/december/suffolklocalpolicingreview

25.02.16

The Good Citizen Award Scam
Action Fraud has been receiving reports of an advanced fee fraud whereby suspects phone a member of the public and claim to be calling on behalf of the UK (or British) Government Grant Department.

They go on to state that the individual has won a Good Citizen Award – of typically £8,000 – and that the grant can be released for a fee (of around £210).

Fortunately, very few members of the public have lost any money as a result of this scam but have reported to Action Fraud in order to help build a picture of this fraud and protect others from falling victim to it.

Protect yourself:
• There is no genuine ‘Good Citizen Award’ scheme in the UK that operates by cold calling “winners” and asking for an upfront fee to release a grant.
• If you receive a call that claims to represent such a scheme, it is a scam. End the phone call – do not give out any personal or financial data.
If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

DVSA Fixed Penalty Email Scam Warning
The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has been made aware that members of the public have received emails claiming to be from the DVSA Fixed Penalty Office with an attachment to a 'fixed penalty receipt'.

Do not open the attachment, or click on any links within the email, and do not reply to it. The DVSA never sends fixed penalty notices to customers via email.

Read more on this here

Help during power cuts
Do you need extra support during a power cut? Join the Priority Services Register offered by UK Power Networks.

By joining the register, you will receive:
✔ A priority phone number that you can call 24 hours a day and regular updates until your power is back on
✔ A welcome pack with useful advice about preparing for a power cut
✔ Regular text message updates if you text ‘Power’ followed by your postcode to 80876
✔ Extra support from the British Red Cross 

 

16.02.16

 

Police investigating following a fatal collision on the A12 at Martlesham on Thursday are appealing for the driver of a slate grey 4x4 vehicle to come forward.

 

A 20-month-old girl died in Addenbrookes hospital on Friday following the collision that happened on the southbound dual-carriageway, between the Tesco and BT roundabouts, around 1.45pm on Thursday 11 February.

 

The driver of the large 4x4 – thought to be a woman, described as white, in her 40s to early 50s with blonde hair – is being sought as a potential witness as this vehicle is thought to have been behind the two cars involved in the crash.

 

It is possible the driver may not have initially realised the seriousness of the incident and police are urging her to get in touch. If this was you, or if you saw the collision and have not yet spoken to police, please call PC Barry O’Neill by dialling Suffolk Police on 101 quoting CAD number 187 of Thursday 11 February.

 

25.01.16

Police in Mid Suffolk are reminding motorists not to leave valuables in their vehicles and to ensure they are locked, after a spate of thefts.

Since 3January & 19 January there were around 27 thefts from vehicles and 10 thefts of vehicles from the Mid Suffolk area, most recently from Stowmarket & Stowupland areas. Most have occurred during the hours of darkness and early morning.

 Items stolen include iPods, iPads, sunglasses, a purse, cash and backpacks.

 Please ensure that you remove valuables from your vehicle when leaving them unattended and make sure they are locked & secure.

 


18.01.16

Suffolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Tim Passmore is asking Suffolk council tax payers whether they would be prepared to pay a little bit extra each week towards the police service they receive.

 The consultation, which runs until January 28th, asks what Suffolk residents think about the PCC’s proposal to raise the police precept in the next financial year by 1.958%, which for a Band D property equates to an increase of less than 7p each week.

 Tim Passmore said, “Suffolk Constabulary faces significant financial challenges in the coming financial years, they also face radical changes across the policing landscape.

 

“The government's financial settlement for Suffolk, announced last month, was based on the assumption that I will take advantage of my power to increase the policing element of the council tax. I appreciate this is an additional burden on council tax payers but I intend to use the £830K created by the precept rise to fund 20 police officers to focus on protecting vulnerable people and support the county's cyber-crime investigations and three PCSOs to work specifically in schools across the county.”

 He added, “I want to hear people’s views and urge everyone to take a look at the survey or, if they do not have access to the internet, to write to me directly at Police Headquarters in Martlesham.

 “Please take a look at our online survey at www.suffolk-pcc.gov.uk and tell me what you think.”

 The survey closes at 4pm on January 28th.

 

 

18.01.16

 

Suffolk Constabulary is supporting a Home Office campaign reminding the public that they should call 101 if they need to contact their local police for non-emergency issues.

More than three quarters of 999 calls received by the police are for non-emergencies, such as people reporting crimes that are no longer in progress (for example discovering that their home has been burgled or their vehicle has been stolen), or wanting to discuss anti-social behaviour in their local area.

The constabulary is sharing the messages, to remind the public that they should call 101 to speak to the police when there isn’t a crime in progress or risk of violence or to life.

The number should be used for police matters only, which will enable the constabulary to provide an improved service from the moment they are called, providing the appropriate response right away, rather than transferring callers to other agencies. The campaign will also encourage the public to remind their family and friends of the service.

A quick way to contact the police

101 is an easy-to-remember number for the public to call the police, and is designed to reduce the number of non-emergency 999 calls. This allows the police to respond more quickly to genuine emergencies, such as when someone is in immediate danger, a crime is happening right now, or a suspect for a serious crime is nearby.

 Launched in 2012, it now covers all police forces across the UK and has replaced individual forces’ local numbers. A call to 101 costs just 15 pence no matter how long your call is. Not only is this cheaper than some forces’ local numbers, the single rate for every call means you know exactly how much your call will cost.

In addition to reminding members of the public to use the 101 number instead of 999 for non-emergencies, Suffolk Constabulary would also like to stress that 101 should still only be used for police matters.

Many people call 101 to report matters that are not for the police to deal with and should have been directed to other agencies. Many of these are matters that should be reported to local authorities to deal with such as: highways issues (e.g. road signs, potholes, street lighting & traffic lights); noise nuisances; and lost/found dogs.

Superintendent Louisa Pepper, lead for the Contact and Control Room, said:

 "I cannot stress how important it is that members of the public use the correct number to contact police, as we still receive calls to 999 that are not emergencies.

"These misplaced calls could potentially delay us in responding to genuine emergencies, where officers might have been able to halt a crime in progress or assist where lives are at risk.

"101 is an easy to remember alternative number to contact police on where a crime has already occurred or for other non-emergency matters. However, as part of this campaign we also want to educate the public on what matters they should be calling the police about in general.

"Many of the calls we currently receive on the 101 number are not ‘core police business’ and we often have to redirect to another agency.  The simple test for most people is whether their call is connected with crime and disorder – if it isn’t then they most likely should be calling one of our partners.

"Knowing who to call in the first place will not only reduce the volume of calls to our staff, but will save members of the public time by speaking to the correct organisation in the first instance. To assist with this, general information and on-line forms are available on our website.”

Tim Passmore, Police & Crime Commissioner for Suffolk, said: "The 101 number plays an important role in the Constabulary's call answering service. It is designed to divert non-emergency calls away from the 999 service and this is very effective, providing callers only use it for policing matters.

"The easy to remember number is unfortunately plagued with calls about issues that are not for the police to deal with.

 "I am very happy to support this Home Office campaign to raise awareness of the 101 number and hope it will encourage people to remember the number but not to use it for anything other than for genuine policing issues. There is a tendency for the number to be used for non-policing enquiries and this inevitably creates delays for those who have enquiries about genuine policing issues.


"In order to get the best possible service from the police control room it is vital that people use the 101 service appropriately so I would encourage people to heed the important messages from the campaign.”

 Further information is available at www.suffolk.police.uk and www.askthe.police.uk

 

Members of the public are also reminded not to confuse 101 with the NHS non-emergency number 111.

 

 

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.

http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

DO NOT USE THIS LINK IN AN EMERGENCY OR IN A SITUATION THAT REQUIRES AN IMMEDIATE POLICE RESPONSE WHEN YOU SHOULD RING 999.

 

 

11.01.16

 

Heating Oil Thefts

Heating oil thefts have been occurring in Suffolk. Police are appealing for people to be vigilant, and to report any suspicious activity to the police. The following crime prevention advice is provided for oil tank owners:

Keep your tank in a well overlooked position – this will ensure thieves are more likely to be seen.

If your tank is close to your house make sure that it can be seen from your windows – this coupled with lighting will make it less of a target.

Security lights can help deter potential thieves. Low level ‘dusk ‘til dawn’ lights positioned close to the tank should, in most cases, provide sufficient light to illuminate any suspicious activity.

Enclosing your tank in a building which can be secured is better still. However it is important not to overlook the importance of ventilation; advice should be sought from your oil company.

If you have a gate keep it closed and locked when you are out.

Make sure your perimeter fence is in good condition and is not easy to climb. Consider the use of trellis on top of any rear fencing to increase height.

Invest in a good quality lock. Close shackle padlocks are recommended as they offer better resistance to bolt croppers and other tools that thieves usually come equipped with.

Check your oil gauges regularly to alert you to any potential thefts and help investigations by narrowing crime times down. Many tanks can be fitted with a gauge to monitor levels which can be read inside the house.

Consider installing a tank alarm.

Spam email warning

We have recently been advised that some members of the public are receiving an email that is designed to scare or entice them into reading the email and to then open an attachment.

The email purports to be a penalty charge notification with the subject of: ‘Invoice for IA20122439 (random numbers but all appear to commence ‘IA’)’

These emails appear to be sent from random senders and they contain a malicious Word doc or Excel XLS spreadsheet attachment. If the attachment is opened, it will download various Trojans and password stealers especially banking Trojans and ransomware like cryptolocker or Teslacrypt which will encrypt all data on the end device and demand the user pays a ransom.

The email may appear similar to the following:


From: (a variety of fictitious or real companies)
Date: Wed 06/01/2016 09:50
Subject: Invoice for IA20122439

To Whom It May Concern,

Please find attached an invoice relating to Penalty Charge Notice Number IA01791153 along with a copy of the contravention.

In order to prevent this fine from escalating further we have paid this fine on your behalf. Should you have any queries concerning these charges please don’t hesitate to contact me.
Payment for this invoice will be taken by Direct Debit 9 working days from the date of this email.

Please refer to page 2, point 3.6 in your Terms and Conditions for information on Traffic Offences.



All the alleged senders, companies, names of employees and phone numbers mentioned in these emails may be innocent and are just picked at random by the criminals who are generating these emails. Some of these companies will exist and some won’t.

Criminals choose companies, government departments and other organisations with ‘subjects’ that are designed to entice or alarm a person into blindly opening the attachment or clicking the link in the email to see what is happening.

These emails are a scam, any one receiving one of these are advised that they should not open the attachment.

Further advice in relation to emails such as this can be obtained at: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/fraud-az-phishing

OurWatch and SNWA

The Neighbourhood and Home Watch Network (England and Wales)

The Neighbourhood and Home Watch Network is a coordinated national network, supporting and promoting Watch groups around England and Wales. They provide a wide range of information, support and services, and their website is a great source of help for scheme coordinators and members. To find out more visit http://www.ourwatch.org.uk/

The Suffolk Neighbourhood Watch Association

The SNWA is the county wide organisation that works to link NW schemes in Suffolk and to provide a forum for members to meet and share knowledge and activities.
The SNWA also provides a variety of information, services and support. To find out more, visit it’s website at http://www.suffolknwa.co.uk/

YOUR SAFER NEIGHBOURHOOD TEAM (SNT)
To speak with an Officer from your SNT - telephone 101, or email your local SNT team – midsuffcentral.snt@suffolk.pnn.police.uk
Please remember to visit your local SNT’s web site on a regular basis at http://www.suffolk.police.uk/saferneighbourhood.aspx where you can find out more about the local policing priorities that have been set with your community input, and about the actions the teams are taking in your area.

MALCOLM MCKESSAR
Community Watch Liaison Officer
(Mid-Suffolk Region)
Stowmarket Police Station
Violet Hill Road, Stowmarket, IP14 1NJ
Telephone : 01473 613888 (ext 3388)
Email : malcolm.mckessar@suffolk.pnn.police.uk
If you have any information about any crime, please contact your local Police by dialling 101, or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. For all Emergencies, dial 999.  

 

07.01.16

Police are appealing for information in relation to a stolen watch from Ipswich.

Between Thursday 24 to Friday 25 December 2015, a watch was found to be missing from within a property in Brettenham Crescent.

The watch is a Franck Muller ‘Cortez 10000 H SC Conquistador’ with a Case No. 1932. The watch is encased with diamonds and has a black face with white numbers.  It is valued in the region of approximately £25,000.

Images of the watch are attached.

If you have seen the watch or know its whereabouts please contact PC Luke Burgin from Ipswich Police quoting crime reference 37/23319/15 on 101.  

 

04.01.16

 

Most burglaries are committed by opportunist criminals who happen to see insecure premises where they can help themselves to the property inside. In most cases the burglary could have been prevented. By following a few simple precautions, you can reduce the chance of you becoming a victim of burglary.  Fit secure locks to all doors and fit a door chain or bar.  Fit visible window locks, including rear or side windows and those above a low roof.  Visible burglar alarms make burglars think twice; get specialist advice and consult your insurance company.  Use timer switches to turn on lights and radios when you are out to give the impression that your home is occupied.  Be alert to strangers loitering in residential streets; if in doubt call the police.  Be aware of fire risks and means of escape. Make sure you have a smoke alarm fitted.  Never leave spare keys in a hiding place such as under a doormat, in a flowerpot or inside the letterbox.  Ensure valuables are suitably security marked; if not practicable, take photographs of valuable items and keep a note of any serial numbers.

 

Ensure that handbags, wallets, mobile phones and car keys are kept safely in your bedroom at night. Some thieves purposely enter houses to take car keys in order to steal cars sat on the driveway.  Fit a strong, lockable gate across side passages.  Always leave garages and sheds locked.  Consider fitting an alarm to your garage or shed.  Keep any ladders locked.  Keep expensive garden equipment and furniture locked in a shed overnight or when you are away.  Provide good lighting and fit movement detectors.  Keep dustbins and wheelie-bins away from fencing/gates, which access your property (these are used by thieves to easily climb over barriers).  Keep hedges and shrubs at the front of your house cut down to a height of 1m and pollard tree branches up to 2.4m. This provides clear sight lines across the front of you property enhancing natural surveillance and creates a ‘see and be seen feel’. If you have been a victim of burglary we can visit you and provide direct advice on how to avoid being a repeat victim. Simply dial 101 and ask to speak to your local Crime Reduction Officer.

 

Officers are seeing an increased number of thefts in Suffolk, mainly targeting older people, in which their bank cards are stolen and then fraudulently used.

Offenders are known to use a variety of methods including ‘shoulder surfing’; standing close enough to the victim to identify their PIN number when using a bank card, before then stealing the card using different methods of distraction.

In a previous incident a woman suspect was seen to approach a pensioner using a cashpoint machine (ATM). She purposefully dropped something on the floor and nudged it towards the victim. She told him that he had dropped something and as he bent down to pick it up the woman’s accomplice took the victim’s card from the machine and swapped it for another without him noticing. It is believed that the accomplice was watching as the victim entered his PIN into the machine. The victim then took the swapped card from the ATM, none the wiser that the suspects had both his bank card and the PIN. The suspects then used the card to obtain cash from the victim’s account.

More recent methods used by suspects have involved asking for directions/change, particularly in supermarket car parks. Whilst the victim was distracted, the accomplice stole bank cards from the victim, often without the victim noticing. The suspect or their accomplice obtained the PIN by the watching the number being entered either at the supermarket till or ATM.

Officers are particularly keen to trace any vehicles that might be used by the suspects who are described as being a white man and a white woman who both wear smart casual clothes. The woman has long blonde hair sometimes tied up. Both are described as speaking with east European accents and police are releasing CCTV images of them in a bid to trace them.

Anybody who knows the identity of this man or woman or has any information are asked to call Suffolk Police on 101 reference 14757/15 or contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or through their anonymous online form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org.

Members of the public are urged to be extra vigilant when using their bank cards and to call Suffolk Police on 101 straightaway if they see anything suspicious at cashpoints or see people loitering around, or constantly returning to the machines.  

Police are urging the public to take the following advice;-

Be vigilant when entering your PIN - make sure you cover the keypad on both chip and pin machines and at cash points every time you enter your PIN

Be aware of who is around you and make sure people stay a good distance away from you.  

Don’t let anyone distract you while you are using the cash machine or making a card payment. Cancel the transaction if you are worried.

Keep your valuables secure - never leave them unattended, even for few moments. Keep your belongings tucked away safely in a zipped pocket or bag and use a purse chain if you have one.

Report stolen cards - if you lose your wallet, report it to your bank immediately.

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

 

Officers are seeing an increased number of thefts in Suffolk, mainly targeting older people, in which their bank cards are stolen and then fraudulently used.

Offenders are known to use a variety of methods including ‘shoulder surfing’; standing close enough to the victim to identify their PIN number when using a bank card, before then stealing the card using different methods of distraction.

In a previous incident a woman suspect was seen to approach a pensioner using a cashpoint machine (ATM). She purposefully dropped something on the floor and nudged it towards the victim. She told him that he had dropped something and as he bent down to pick it up the woman’s accomplice took the victim’s card from the machine and swapped it for another without him noticing. It is believed that the accomplice was watching as the victim entered his PIN into the machine. The victim then took the swapped card from the ATM, none the wiser that the suspects had both his bank card and the PIN. The suspects then used the card to obtain cash from the victim’s account.

More recent methods used by suspects have involved asking for directions/change, particularly in supermarket car parks. Whilst the victim was distracted, the accomplice stole bank cards from the victim, often without the victim noticing. The suspect or their accomplice obtained the PIN by the watching the number being entered either at the supermarket till or ATM.

Officers are particularly keen to trace any vehicles that might be used by the suspects who are described as being a white man and a white woman who both wear smart casual clothes. The woman has long blonde hair sometimes tied up. Both are described as speaking with east European accents and police are releasing CCTV images of them in a bid to trace them.

Anybody who knows the identity of this man or woman or has any information are asked to call Suffolk Police on 101 reference 14757/15 or contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or through their anonymous online form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org.

Members of the public are urged to be extra vigilant when using their bank cards and to call Suffolk Police on 101 straightaway if they see anything suspicious at cashpoints or see people loitering around, or constantly returning to the machines.  

Police are urging the public to take the following advice;-

Be vigilant when entering your PIN - make sure you cover the keypad on both chip and pin machines and at cash points every time you enter your PIN

Be aware of who is around you and make sure people stay a good distance away from you.  

Don’t let anyone distract you while you are using the cash machine or making a card payment. Cancel the transaction if you are worried.

Keep your valuables secure - never leave them unattended, even for few moments. Keep your belongings tucked away safely in a zipped pocket or bag and use a purse chain if you have one.

Report stolen cards - if you lose your wallet, report it to your bank immediately.

Help us keep our communities safe by reporting any suspicious activity. 

Please use the following link to pass useful information to Suffolk Police about any incident.http://www.suffolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/reportacrime/tellthepolice.aspx 

 

 

31 December 2015

 

Suffolk Constabulary is issuing a robust reminder to anyone planning to organise an illegal rave in the county ahead of the New Year bank holiday.

 

The Constabulary is re-iterating previous warnings that officers will be adopting a zero tolerance approach, clamping down on individuals who choose to break the law and ruin peace in their community.

 

Regular officers together with the assistance of volunteer officers from the Special Constabulary are preparing for the forthcoming New Year celebrations with extra patrols being planned to prevent illegal raves from taking place and intelligence and social networking sites will be monitored to enable early preventative action to be taken.

 

Residents can play a key role in preventing such events and the public are being asked to assist police by reporting any suspicious activity around open land or disused buildings.

 

Landowners also need to remain vigilant and immediately report any activity, which may lead them to suspect a rave is being organised on their land. Extra care should be taken to ensure that property entrances are secure wherever possible.

 

The police need to be informed of:  

 

  • Any information that an illegal rave is taking place

  • Any sightings of vans, lorries or large numbers of vehicles gathering near woods, rural car parks or near to disused buildings/warehouse

  • Sightings of fliers advertising raves

  • Broken padlocks on access gates, to areas where a rave may take place.

 

Coupled with this, community centres, village halls and other venues have been contacted to ensure they are asking the right questions about the nature of the event when taking bookings.

 

Chief Inspector Matthew Rose, Head of Community Safety said: "Historically unlicensed music events often take place at New Year or on Bank Holidays. It is much easier to stop a rave before it starts, so early notification of one taking place is critical in helping us police these events.

 

I want to warn anyone who is considering organising a rave that they will face prosecution for holding such an event – we have successfully prosecuted people previously in Suffolk and will continue with our zero tolerance approach for any future raves held in the county. We will seize any sound and other equipment, causing significant financial loss to organisers and we will also seek prosecution.

 

Ultimately public safety is the primary concern for us. Where officers can prevent, disrupt or stop a rave taking place, we will do everything within our power to do this, providing that it is in the best interests of all concerned, given the specific circumstances that we are faced with.”

 

Police have powers, which enable them to seize vehicles and sound equipment in certain circumstances. As such they are urging anyone who rents sound or lighting equipment to only do so to people who they believe to have a valid and legal reason. Seized equipment will be retained as evidence for any prosecution.

 

If you have any information that could assist the Police in relation to unlicensed music events taking place please contact Suffolk Constabulary on 101 or Crime stoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.